How to find my wallet address? : Electrum

What will happend if I recover my funds with Electrum from one private key (not seed)? Exactly, 1Q: How can I get my change address and my private key to this change address? 2Q: Is there such a "BIP" to deploy the whole root from one private key? /r/Bitcoin

What will happend if I recover my funds with Electrum from one private key (not seed)? Exactly, 1Q: How can I get my change address and my private key to this change address? 2Q: Is there such a submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

What will happen if I recover my funds with Electrum wallet from only one private key (not seed)? Exactly, Q1: How can I get my change address and my private key to this change address? Q2: Is there such a "BIP" to derive the whole needed tree structure from one private key? /r/Bitcoin

What will happen if I recover my funds with Electrum wallet from only one private key (not seed)? Exactly, Q1: How can I get my change address and my private key to this change address? Q2: Is there such a submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

XMR.CO is a SCAM!

UPDATE: The money has been returned as of today, 10/15/2020. Not all of it mind you, I assume there were some transfer fees, and it was returned in BTC, not the Monero I was trying to exchange for. It took several emails where I had to be on top of them, asking why I had not got a response in over a week. So xmr.co may NOT be a scam, but at the very least this has been very questionable service.
A couple weeks ago I initiated an exchange for transferring some of BTC to XMR with XMR.CO. I had heard from several places that they were a reputable exchange, so I decided to try it. I sent almost $100 in BTC which took a couple hours to confirm. I provided them with a valid XMR wallet and a valid BTC refund address. No status updated on the exchange page, and no money was ever transferred to my wallet. Naturally I emailed their support [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) and got an automated response that they had received my inquiry. I don't include the original exchange ID on here for obvious reasons.
hello, I did an exchange on your website and sent over bitcoin and i have not received anything. I see there is over 25 confirmations now in my electrum walltet and the status on my exchange hasn't changed. What is going on?
and they never sent me an actual email. I tried responding to the automated email they sent me, and sending them a message on wickr as they state as an alternative way to contact them. I have still not got an answer as to why I am missing nearly $100. This is very frustrating, cause I don't see anything else on here stating that xmr is a scam, so I want to make sure everyone knows, so no one else gets scammed like I did.
UPDATE: Except they gave the money back, so it might not be a scam. But I'm not using them again.
submitted by SolidarityFurever to Monero [link] [comments]

Everyday info sec, hardcore info sec, and DNMs

Edit: Currently writing a new version of this, dont know when it will be done.
Edit: Since first post I have updated a few sections with additional information.
I recommend reading it all even if it is very long, I might have placed some relevant info in different sections while thinking about what else needed to be added, plenty of steps remains mostly the same except when I comment directly on it. It is not necessary to do 100% security all the time, unless you absolutely need it, combining some high and some lower security ideas for a balance of security and convenience is useful.
I will base this mostly on Windows, Linux users probably know this, and I have no idea how apple machines work (tho many things in here are still relevant for other operating systems, as they are just general tips)
Disclaimer: There are certainly other steps that can make you more anonymous or safer, however I think for most people this will surfice. Any software I recommend should be independently verified for security, and examples of software are not to be taken as endorsements. I simply use examples and give recommendations when I believe it necessary, or helpful.
I will not really differentiate between anonymity and security, they are often the same thing. As such the word security can mean either more anonymous, less vulnerable, or both.
--------
Everyday Simple Info Sec:
-There could be a hidden administrator user on your PC, make sure to change its password
(Snapchat msgs, reddit dms, discord msgs, are just a few examples of msgs that are never encrypted)
-Any info even send in encrypted msgs (and obviously non encrypted) should still be kept with possible deniability, don't say "I'm gonna do MDMA", say "I'm going out with molly."
-DO NOT STORE ANY PASSWORDS ON GOOGLE, IF GOOGLE LOGIN IS AUTHENTICATED IT WILL AUTFILL ALL PASSWORDS IT HAS SAVED (same with other similar services) (This means if you are logged in to chrome and someone has access to your machine, they can auto fill passwords without entering a single password)
-use a rememberable passphrase, especially for your master key ring aka password manager A long sentence that is memorable makes an okay password (decent example,: "I met my wife at Little Ceasers for the first time on 07/09/20" better even if it's just something you know, if its impersonal, and if you can add special characters or numbers that you won't forget) (A better example for a passphrase is: "There is 0nly 0ne letter that d0esn’t appear in any U.S. state nameQ")
-Purge your internet activity frequently, there's a reason why I only have one post, and a few comments appearing in my account, but thousands of kama. Exposing information needlessly is not good.
-Never post private information publicly, and if you do, do it vaguely as possible. (Example: Not "I'm 15", say "I'm a teenager") Do not post any vital information ever, no birthdays, mother's maiden name, age, or anything you have ever seen in a security question. Never post your current activities while they are ongoing. You going on a vacation? Don't announce it to the world, taking picture there? Post them when you are home.
-Rethink how you do security questions. Many answers to security questions can be found in your internet history. One could use the first word of the security question as an answer, or a different sceme that will mean you always remember it. (Security question need to go, the amount of personal info an average person puts on the internet makes it easy to attack anything using security question)
-------_
High level crimimal information security:
The motto here is, "All the Security, All the Time" As one fuck up can end with you leaving a lick of traceability, and you could be fucked.
Pre Note: All of your software should always be up to date. Also even perfect info sec does not guarantee you are completely safe, a new zero day (exploit) can still fuck you, but good info security makes you significantly safer, by eliminating as many attacks as possible.
-Get a new device (or make a already owned device seem like you never owned it, do this only if you know how to, there's a lot of stuff that goes into that, like changing your mac adress etc) buy with cash, and your face covered, preferably far away from where you live. (Do I need to specify to not bring your phone or anything else that tracks your location to anywhere you want to go anonymously?) (Be aware that even hardware can have vulnerabilities, many cpus have known vulnerabilities, I can't list them all, do some research before buying)
-If you know how to use Tails (A linux distro designed for Info sec) use that, preferably on a USB. (Or learn how to use tails, its better, but complicated) Otherwise a clean copy of windows (make sure its not in any way associated with you) can do the job too, tho not as well. (Using a VM might give extra security, since VMs usually erase all data and RAM they were using on shutdown)
-Get a non tracking VPN, Enable the kill switch (a setting that disables all traffic that doesn't go through the VPN) (change your firewall settings to only allow the traffic from the VPN, windows guide (Change settings so only traffic from the tor application is send) Edit: (Due to complaints: do not use vpn over tor, use tor over vpn. tor over vpn has no notable downside, if the VPN logs it makes no difference, your ISP will always log anyways, and vpns remove other attack vectors and also provide backup security should tor fail. Again even if the VPN tracks you only change the people doing the tracking, but now you are further removed making it more anonymous and also with less vulnerabilities)
-rember privacy settings, cookie cleaner, and antivirus, password (There could be a hidden administrator user on your PC, make sure to change its password)
-Always use the device on a non admin account
-Ideally use this device only on networks that are not connected with you. Such as public networks (try to never use the same public networks twice, move around) (a home network should be fine now, as it should never be exposed, but more security is always better) (Its just a conveniences vs security trade)
-Never use accounts that have been exposed to lower security on higher security machines
-your browser is now TOR (or your preferred security focused browser, if you dont plan on using onion ) Make sure you get the standalone version of tor not the addon build (the standalone is safer, because there are less settings and options to tweak)
-Change your tor settings, to safest mode, enable a bridge (to my knowledge there's no difference in security between the build in bridges in tor), enable automatic updates, set duckduckgo onion as your primary browser. Set dark.fail onion page as your home page. (Or your preferred privacy search engine and onion directory)
-------_
How to use dark net markets (DNMs)
If you finished your High Security setup, we can dive right in. Otherwise go do that. This is where all that is essential.
Quick info on Tor, and onion sites. There is no search engine. It's all based of directories and addresses you are given by others. Tor will likely not be very quick, it has to pass through multiple networks to get to the destination. DNMs sometimes exit scam, an exit scam is when a market shuts down completely and takes all the money, this is a risk when using DNMs, it's not too common but happens maybe 0-4 times a year. The admins of thoese servers need to get out at some point, before they get jailed, so they exit the game, and scam everyone out of their money.
-A very useful onion directory is dark.fail it has a lot of links, for all kinds of stuff. News, email, DNMs, Psychonautwiki (harm reduction website), forums etc. (Other directories also exist)
-Pick a market, preferably one that handles secure connection server side instead of requiring you to establish the secure connection. Then create an account. Your account once created should include an entry box in your profile for a pgp key, post your PUBLIC key in there. (Verify the link is not a scam, most markets should provide a pgp signature)
-Next is currency setup. All major cryptocurrency exchangers can be used, I can recommend coin base but there could be better ones out there. Unless you find a small non U.S., exchange, they will always ask for your identity. So unless you can find a trustworthy exchange that doesn't ID, you will need to give it to them. (Side note, all major crypto exchangers report to the IRS, if the IRS asks you if you bought cryptocurrency and you bought while having IDed yourself SAY YES, DO NOT COMMIT TAX FRAUD WHEN THEY KNOW YOU DID)
-Transfer (monero you can send directly, btc you should scramble) to your wallet. There are two options a cold wallet (physical) or a software wallet. Software wallets usually dont cost anything so I recommend them, even if often less safe. Electrum is easy to use, and pretty safe. You can also do your own research and find a wallet that fits your needs.
-now you are ready to buy, only buy using escrow (it means the money is held by the market as a middle man until the product is delivered, they will also handle any issues like wrong quantity, cuts, etc), judge the reviews for a product, and if available look at the history of the vendor, until you find a product from a vendor you trust. (I recommend to buy within your country as much as possible, so it doesn't go through customs, it's very rare that something is found, but it can happen)
-now you get to buy, depending on market, you either have cryptocurrency stored in their wallets (not recommend, you will lose it in an exit scam) or you can send it every order. When you send your delivery adress (or the one you want it to go to) encrypt the adress using the sellers public key. Make sure the adress is correct.
-wait for the product, make sure to extend the escrow until the product arrives, if you can't extend it anymore dispute the order, and a moderator will step in
-test the product, use it, and leave a review. PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW, DNMs only work because of reviews.
Edit: Didn't imagine I would write over 15000 words. Oh well, it was fun. Hope it helps, if you have any questions feel free to ask.
No idea how long this will stay up, I might purge it in 7 days, or never.
submitted by seven_N_A7 to u/seven_N_A7 [link] [comments]

Power of the Command Line (bitcoin-cli, hwi, electrum, trezorctl)

I think some of the console tools available with HW wallets today are greatly under utilized. Here's a quick write-up on how to create and sign a TXN very similar to 43d27...1fc06 found on the SLIP-14 wallet. I'll be using TrezorCTL, Electrum, and HWI for the signing. I won't go much into the setup or install, but feel free to ask if you have questions about it. Note, you don't have to use all three of these. Any one will produce a valid signed TXN for broadcast. I just showed how to do it three ways. Whats more some of the Electrum and HWI steps are interchangeable.
ColdCard also has a utility called ckcc that will do the sign operation instead of HWI, but in many ways they are interchangeable. KeepKey and Ledger both have libraries for scripted signing but no one-shot, one-line console apps that I know of. But HWI and Electrum of course work on all four.

TrezorCTL

This is the what most would think of to use to craft and sign TXNs, and is definitely very simple. The signing uses a script called build_tx.py to create a JSON file that is then used by the btc sign-tx command. The whole process is basically:
  1. tools/build_tx.py | trezorctl btc sign-tx -
This just means, take the output of build_tx and sign it. To copy 43d27...1fc06, I wrote a small script to feed build_tx, so my process looks like:
  1. ~/input.sh | tools/build_tx.py | trezorctl btc sign-tx -
But it's all very simple. Note... I used TrezorCTL v0.12.2 but build_tx.py version 0.13.0 1.

input.sh

```

!/bin/bash

secho() { sleep 1; echo $*}
secho "Testnet" # coin name secho "tbtc1.trezor.io" # blockbook server and outpoint (below) secho "e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00:0" secho "m/84'/1'/0'/0/0" # prev_out derivation to signing key secho "4294967293" # Sequence for RBF; hex(-3) secho "segwit" # Signature type on prev_out to use secho "" # NACK to progress to outs secho "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3" # out[0].addr secho "10000000" # out[1].amt secho "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu" # out[1].addr secho "20000000" # out[1].amt secho "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x" # out[2].addr secho "99999694" # out[2].amt secho "" # NACK to progress to change secho "" # NACK to skip change secho "2" # txn.version secho "0" # txn.locktime ```

Electrum

Electrum is one of the better GUI wallets available, but it also has a pretty good console interface. Like before you need your Trezor with the SLIP-14 wallet loaded and paired to Electrum. I'll assume Electrum is up and running with the Trezor wallet loaded to make things simple.
Like with TrezorCTL, Electrum feeds on a JSON file, but unlike TrezorCTL it needs that JSON squished into the command line. This is a simple sed command, but I won't bore you with the details, but just assume that's done. So the process in Electrum (v4.0.3) looks like:
  1. electrum serialize (create psbt to sign)
  2. electrum --wallet signtransaction (sign said psbt)
Still pretty simple right! Below is the JSON I smushed for #1

txn.json

{ "inputs": [{ "prevout_hash":"e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00", "prevout_n": 0, "value_sats": 129999867 }], "outputs": [{ "address": "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3", "value_sats": 10000000 },{ "address": "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu", "value_sats": 20000000 },{ "address": "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x", "value_sats": 99999694 }]}

HWI

HWI is an unsung hero in my book. It's a very small clean and simple interface between HW wallets and Bitcoin Core. It currently supports a good range of HW wallets. It keeps itself narrowly focused on TXN signing and offloads most everything else to Bitcoin Core. Again, I'll assume you've imported your Trezor keypool into Core and done the requisite IBD and rescan. And if you don't have the RPC enabled, you can always clone these commands into the QT-console.
To sign our TXN in HWI (v1.1.2), we will first need to craft (and finalize) it in Bitcoin Core (0.21.1). Like in Electrum, we will have to use simple sed to smush some JSON into command arguments, but I'll assume you have that covered. It will take an inputs.json and an outputs.json named separately.
  1. bitcoin-cli createpsbt (create psbt)
  2. bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet= walletprocesspsbt (process psbt)
  3. hwi -f signtx (sign psbt)
  4. bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet= finalizepsbt (get a signed TXN from psbt)
A little more involved, but still nothing too bad. Plus this gives you the full power of Bitcoin Core including integrations with LND (lightning).

inputs.json

[{ "txid": "e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00", "vout": 0 }]

outputs.json

[{ "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3": 0.10000000 },{ "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu": 0.20000000 },{ "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x": 0.99999694 }]

Conclusion

This may all seem like very low level coding, but is surprisingly simple once you get a knack for it. Whats more, all these platforms support testnet which allows you to practice with valueless coins until you get the hang of it. And, like many things in bitcoin, this is all (mostly) python, which is one of the easier languages to learn.
Enjoy
Footnotes
1 - https://github.com/trezotrezor-firmware/issues/1296
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Was I phished.. Or? After downloading newest Electrum from official site.. help please!

Hello!
Earlier today, before purchasing BTC online, I updated my electrum by downloading the newest version (4.0.3) from the official site (electrum.org - which was also the first result on Bing).
When I clicked the "copy to clipboard" button for my receiving address, I noticed the address copied to my clipboard was different than the one displayed. I tried this a few different times with several different addresses with the same result. I figured that perhaps the address being displayed (not the one that was being copied to my clipboard) was perhaps just a bug or some sort of error, and that the address being copied to my clipboard HAD to be my address since it was coming from my wallet. But maybe I was wrong..
I proceeded to withdrawal the bitcoin from the site I purchased from, having the coin sent to the address that was being copied to my clipboard. Except this time, I didn't notice any coins being sent to my electrum wallet.
I opened Electrum and under the addresses tab, searched for the address that was being copied to my clipboard via the "copy to clipboard" button I used under receiving addresses as previously mentioned, however there was no sign of the address in the addresses tab. And each time I would click the "copy to clipboard" button for receiving addresses, it would give me another address that was not listed under my addresses tab.
This happened hours ago and I'm not sure what to do at this point. I'm not sure if I've somehow been phished, even using the official website, or if there's something I'm missing/overlooked. Whatever the case, I cant afford to lose the amount of money lost.
If anyone could please help shed some light on the situation, I would very much appreciate any insight you may have to offer. I'm at a complete loss at this point. Is there anything I can do? Am I missing something here? Or... am I totally screwed? Thank you for your time.
submitted by Abyssed77 to Electrum [link] [comments]

"My transaction is stuck, what to do?" - an explainer [DRAFT]

In the last days we have been experiencing a sharp rise in price, which is historically correlated with many people transacting over the Bitcoin network. Many people transacting over the Bitcoin network implies that the blockspace is in popular demand, meaning that when you send a transaction, it has to compete with other transactions for the inclusion in one of the blocks in the future. Miners are motivated by profits and transactions that pay more than other transactions are preferred when mining a new block. Although the network is working as intended (blockspace is a scarce good, subject to supply/demand dynamics, regulated purely by fees), people who are unfamiliar with it might feel worried that their transaction is “stuck” or otherwise somehow lost or “in limbo”. This post attempts to explain how the mempool works, how to optimize fees and that one does not need to worry about their funds.

TL;DR: Your funds are safe. Just be patient* and it'll be confirmed at some point. A transaction either will be confirmed or it never leaves your wallet, so there is nothing to worry about in regards to the safety of your coins.

You can see how the mempool "ebbs and flows", and lower fee tx's get confirmed in the "ebb" times (weekends, nights): https://jochen-hoenicke.de/queue/#0,30d
* if you are in hurry there are things like RBF (Replace By Fee) and CPFC (Child Pays For Parent), which you can use to boost your transaction fees; you will need an advanced wallet like Bitcoin Core or Electrum for that though. Keep also in mind that this is not possible with any transaction (RBF requires opt in before sending, f.ex). If nothing else works and your transaction really needs a soon confirmation, you can try and contact a mining pool to ask them if they would include your transaction. Some mining pools even offer a web-interface for this: 1, 2.
Here’s how Andreas Antonopoulos describes it:
In bitcoin there is no "in transit". Transactions are atomic meaning they either happen all at once or don't happen at all. There is no situation where they "leave" one wallet and are not simultaneously and instantaneously in the destination address. Either the transaction happened or it didn't. The only time you can't see the funds is if your wallet is hiding them because it is tracking a pending transaction and doesn't want you to try and spend funds that are already being spent in another transaction. It doesn't mean the money is in limbo, it's just your wallet waiting to see the outcome. If that is the case, you just wait. Eventually the transaction will either happen or will be deleted by the network.
tl;dr: your funds are safe

How is the speed of confirmations determined in bitcoin?

Open this site: https://jochen-hoenicke.de/queue/#0,2w
Here you see how many transactions are currently (and were historically) waiting to be confirmed, i.e how many transactions are currently competing with your transaction for blockspace (=confirmation).
You can see two important things: the differently coloured layers, each layer representing a different fee (higher layer = higher fees). You can point at a layer and see which fees (expressed in sat/byte) are represented in this layer. You can then deduct which layer your own transaction is currently at, and how far away from the top your position is (miners work through the mempool always from the top, simply because the tx's on top pay them more). You can estimate that each newly mined block removes roughly 1.xMB from the top (see the third graph which shows the mempool size in MB). On average, a new block is produced every ten minutes. But keep in mind that over time more transactions come into the mempool, so there can be periods where transactions are coming faster than transactions being “processed” by miners.
The second important observation is that the mempool "ebbs and flows", so even the lower paid transactions are periodically being confirmed at some point.
In short: what determines the speed of a confirmation is A) how high you set the fees (in sat/byte), B) how many other transactions with same or higher fees are currently competing with yours and C) how many transactions with higher paid fees will be broadcast after yours.
A) you can influence directly, B) you can observe in real time, but C) is difficult to predict. So it's always a little tricky to tell when the first confirmation happens if you set your fees low. But it's quite certain that at some point even the cheap transactions will come through.

So what happens if my transaction stays unconfirmed for days or even weeks?

Transactions are being broadcast by the full nodes on the network. Each node can adjust their settings for how long they keep unconfirmed transactions in their mempool. That’s why there is not a fixed amount of time after which a transaction is dropped from the mempool, but most nodes drop unconfirmed tx’s after two weeks [IS THIS CORRECT?]. This means that in the absolute worst case the unconfirmed transaction will simply disappear from the network, as if it never happened. Keep in mind that in those two weeks the coins never actually leave your wallet. It’s just that your wallet doesn’t show them as “available”, but you still have options like RBF and CPFP to get your transaction confirmed with higher fees, or to “cancel” your transaction by spending the same coins onto another address with a higher fee.

Helpful tools to estimate fees for future transactions:

Here are some resources that can help you estimate fees when sending a bitcoin transaction, so you don't end up overpaying (or underpaying) unnecessarily. Keep in mind that in order to take advantage of this, you need a proper bitcoin wallet which allows for custom fee setting. A selection of such wallets you can find here or here.
The order here is roughly from advanced to easy.
1) https://jochen-hoenicke.de/queue/#0,24h
Here you can see a visualization of how many unconfirmed transactions are currently on the network, as well as how many were there in the past. Each coloured layer represents a different fee amount. F.ex the deep blue (lowest layer) are the 1sat/byte transactions, slightly brighter level above are the 2sat/byte transactions and so on.
The most interesting graph is the third one, which shows you the size of the current mempool in MB and the amount of transactions with different fee levels, which would compete with your transaction if you were to send it right now. This should help you estimating how high you need to set the fee (in sat/byte) in order to have it confirmed "soon". But this also should help you to see that even the 1sat/byte transactions get confirmed very regularly, especially on weekends and in the night periods, and that the spikes in the mempool are always temporary. For that you can switch to higher timeframes in the upper right corner, f.ex here is a 30 days view: https://jochen-hoenicke.de/queue/#0,30d. You clearly can see that the mempool is cyclical and you can set a very low fee if you are not in hurry.
2) https://mempool.space
This is also an overview of the current mempool status, although less visual than the previous one. It shows you some important stats, like the mempool size, some basic stats of the recent blocks (tx fees, size etc). Most importantly, it makes a projection of how large you need to set your fees in sat/byte if you want your transaction to be included in the next block, or within the next two/three/four blocks. You can see this projection in the left upper corner (the blocks coloured in brown).
3) https://whatthefee.io
This is a simple estimation tool. It shows you the likelihood (in %) of a particular fee size (in sat/byte) to be confirmed within a particular timeframe (measured in hours). It is very simple to use, but the disadvantage is that it shows you estimates only for the next 24 hours. You probably will overpay by this method if your transaction is less time sensitive than that.
4) https://twitter.com/CoreFeeHelper
This is a very simple bot that tweets out fees projections every hour or so. It tells you how you need to set the fees in order to be confirmed within 1hou6hours/12hours/1day/3days/1week. Very simple to use.
Hopefully one of these tools will help you save fees for your next bitcoin transaction. Or at least help you understand that even with a very low fee setting your transaction will be confirmed sooner or later. Furthermore, I hope it makes you understand how important it is to use a wallet that allows you to set your own fees.
submitted by TheGreatMuffin to u/TheGreatMuffin [link] [comments]

CashFusion privacy/security question

Running Electron Cash with CashFusion works, however there is one big privacy problem. Electron Cash will query the server with all addresses in your wallet. If you use a public server, this will reveal to the server both the inputs and outputs of all your fusions.
This can be avoided by running your own server. Bitcoin Unlimited includes an electrum server. Launching BU with -electrum=1 will start a server (and use an additional 50-100 GB of disk space). You can then have electron cash connect to this server.
This works, however there are two major problems. For this to work, you must disable tor and you must disable SSL. Electron cash will then connect to the cashfusion server without tor (thus revealing your IP address) and if you don't remove all the other electrum servers in the list, it will connect to them without SSL.
If I re-enable tor, then it can not connect to my local server, unless I make my server open to anyone, which I'd rather not do.
What's the best way to handle this?
submitted by meowmeow26 to btc [link] [comments]

Checking for btc sending address. Help.

I re-installed electrum after a long time and reloaded my old wallet. As i wanted to check on a purchase transaction from a few years ago.
I clicked on it and it provided details i do not understand.
How do i find out the sending address? What is the btc address my btc was deducted from to make the payment.
Thanks.
Edit: when i search the transaction id with various block chain explorers, it lists as input/output or sendereceiver sometimes. And my bitcoin address is there. I think that shd be it?
https://postimg.cc/R3F73T0W
submitted by Kazozo to Electrum [link] [comments]

Storing your coins safely while not risking loss of keys

This was originally an answer to a question that was asked here, but OP deleted their post.
This might help some newbies (especially the multisig edit at the end), so I want to make sure it's still accessible here.
The original question was whether the Electrum wallet stores a Trezor's private key when using a passphrase.
OP noticed that their Trezor wouldn't connect to their Electrum wallet when entering a different passphrase than they used when creating the wallet. Thus, OP (likely) assumed that the wallet stored the private key, as it somehow knew that a different private key was now used.
Here is my original answer (with some modifications):
IMPORTANT: I'm assuming here that you connected your Trezor by choosing the "hardware wallet" option in Electrum, rather than giving Electrum your 12/24 seed words.
TL;DR: No, your coins are safe :)
I'm assuming by passphrase) you mean the 25th (or 13th) word. When you have this feature enabled, a private key gets generated every time you enter a passphrase. When you enter the same passphrase you used to create the wallet, the wallet with your funds shows up.
Whenever you enter something different, a different private key is generated on your Trezor. This allows you to have multiple different wallets, for example by choosing the passphrases "First Wallet", "Second Wallet", "Third Wallet", or a secret wallet with a secret passphrase.
So whenever you enter a new passphrase when connecting your Trezor to Electrum, the Trezor will send a new public key to Electrum. Electrum will then derive addresses from this public key and check those for balances. It won't find any, as you used a new passphrase.
EDIT: I just realized that you said your wallet doesn't connect to Electrum when you use a different passphrase. This is simply because Electrum doesn't receive the correct public key from the Trezor and therefore Electrum thinks it's a different wallet (which it is).
When you enter the passphrase you used during creation of your wallet, the Trezor will send your actual public key to Electrum, which will then find addresses with balances, which it will show to you. EDIT (to clarify): Connecting your Trezor after creating the wallet is only necessary to send funds or verify addresses, as the public key is already stored in the wallet.dat.
The only thing Electrum actually stores is the public key, which can only be used to look at your Bitcoin, not to move them. You might want to keep this public key a secret as well though, since it links all your funds to you. This is what Electrum stores in the wallet.dat file, which you can just encrypt by choosing a password for it.
Well done using a passphrase by the way! Should someone get their hands on your Trezor, a sophisticated attacker can get the secret key off the device in 15 minutes. Using a passphrase makes this attack almost useless, as the both secret key AND the passphrase are needed to move your funds, and the passphrase is not stored on the device. A passphrase also allows you to hide funds from potential robbers that force you to unlock your wallet.
You can do this by activating the passphrase feature and sending your funds to a wallet with a secret passphrase (do NOT lose this, as losing your passphrase renders your funds inaccessible). Afterwards, you can safely deactivate the passphrase feature, so the device doesn't even ask for one should you get robbed. Simply reactivate it when you need to access your funds.
EDIT: Should you be worried that you might forget your passphrase, you should look into multisig wallets. Depending on how you set this up, you can make it more secure against theft and less likely for you to lose access to your funds.
Say for example you get four wallets: two hardware wallets, a well-protected (airgapped) laptop with Electrum, and a secure mobile wallet that allows for multisig (like Fully Noded).
You can then create a 2-of-4 multisig wallet that requires you to sign transactions with any two of these four wallets.
The increase in security comes from the fact that an attacker now needs full access to two of your devices (or their stored private keys) at once.
At the same time, the fact that you yourself now also need access to only half of your devices means that in the event of a total loss of one (or even two) of them, you can still move your funds to a new wallet.
As long as you do regular checks (e.g. first day of each month), ensuring that you still have access to all your devices' stored private keys, you can always catch a loss of keys and fix this without losing funds (by creating a new multisig wallet and sending the funds there).
This allows you to use a passphrase on your wallets without storing it anywhere physically or digitally. This would usually be very risky, as forgetting the passphrase would lead to a loss of funds, but this risk is now close to eliminated.
(The following part was not in the original answer)
Some IMPORTANT general secruity tips:
  1. Consider including trusted friends and/or family members as co-signers for a multisig wallet. This ensures that it's not even possible for you alone to hand over funds to an attacker. Depending on your level of trust, you might want to make sure that your co-signers can't collaborate to steal your funds (if you include 3 people, create at least a 4-of-n multisig). You could also deliberately make it possible for all or even just some of your co-signers to move your funds (3 co-signers, 3(or less)-of-n multisig) to make sure your funds aren't lost should pass away unexpectedly.
  2. Consider running your own full node and Electrum server (also check the alternatives), which you connect your Electrum wallet to. This ensures that you don't send your public key to anyone else. If someone knows your public key, they know how much BTC you own, making you a potential target.
  3. Always encrypt your wallet.dat (or whatever you called your wallet file), even if it's a watch-only wallet. This protects your public key (see 1. for why you want that).
  4. Create watch-only wallets: Use an airgapped) device to create a wallet with Electrum (make sure to back up the seed phrase) and export the public key. Then create a new watch-only wallet on another device (like your everyday laptop) with that public key to be able to check your funds. To create the initial wallet, you can also use any other hard- or software wallet that allows you to export the master public key.
  5. Hide, or (when using a hardware wallet with a passphrase) even delete your watch-only wallets. Hiding your funds makes you less of a target. When using a hardware wallet, recreating the watch-only wallet is fast and simple, so you don't need to store it if you don't want to check your funds every day. Note that this approach doesn't help much when you don't use a passphrase, as an attacker will obviously check the passphrase-less wallet no matter what.
  6. Keep some funds on your hardware wallet(s). If an attackers sees funds on the wallet(s), they might not force you to enter a passphrase or ask if you have any multisig wallets (lying under pressure is hard).
  7. Hide all your wallets in different places. If someone sees that you have multiple wallets lying around, they might realize you have a multisig wallet.
  8. Don't risk a robber getting (for example) two keys to your 2-of-4 multisig wallet and then racing them to move your funds with the other two keys when they leave. They're gonna come back and be pissed. If it comes to this, you need protection until the robber is caught. STAY SAFE!
  9. The easiest way to solve a problem is to never have it. Don't make yourself a target. If nobody even suspects that you have a multisig (or any wallet at all), they're probably not gonna look for it.
Please correct any mistakes you find and I will edit my post. I will also gladly add more tips to the list. I will of course credit anyone who helps.
Tip for devs who want something cool and important to work on: Make the creation and usage of multisig wallets as noob-friendly as possible. If someone expresses worries about losing access to their funds by forgetting the seed phrase, wallet pin, etc. (someone in my family actually brought this up to me), multisig wallets are the perfect solution as they add redundancy.
submitted by Fittiboy to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Power of the Command Line (bitcoin-cli, hwi, electrum, trezorctl)

I think some of the console tools available with HW wallets today are greatly under utilized. Here's a quick write-up on how to create and sign a TXN very similar to 43d27...1fc06 found on the SLIP-14 wallet. I'll be using TrezorCTL, Electrum, and HWI for the signing. I won't go much into the setup or install, but feel free to ask if you have questions about it. Note, you don't have to use all three of these. Any one will produce a valid signed TXN for broadcast. I just showed how to do it three ways. Whats more some of the Electrum and HWI steps are interchangeable.

TrezorCTL

This is the what most would think of to use to craft and sign TXNs, and is definitely very simple. The signing uses a script called build_tx.py to create a JSON file that is then used by the btc sign-tx command. The whole process is basically:
  1. tools/build_tx.py | trezorctl btc sign-tx -
This just means, take the output of build_tx and sign it. To copy 43d27...1fc06, I wrote a small script to feed build_tx, so my process looks like:
  1. ~/input.sh | tools/build_tx.py | trezorctl btc sign-tx -
But it's all very simple. Note... I used TrezorCTL v0.12.2 but build_tx.py version 0.13.0 1.

input.sh

```

!/bin/bash

secho() { sleep 1; echo $*}
secho "Testnet" # coin name secho "tbtc1.trezor.io" # blockbook server and outpoint (below) secho "e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00:0" secho "m/84'/1'/0'/0/0" # prev_out derivation to signing key secho "4294967293" # Sequence for RBF; hex(-3) secho "segwit" # Signature type on prev_out to use secho "" # NACK to progress to outs secho "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3" # out[0].addr secho "10000000" # out[1].amt secho "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu" # out[1].addr secho "20000000" # out[1].amt secho "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x" # out[2].addr secho "99999694" # out[2].amt secho "" # NACK to progress to change secho "" # NACK to skip change secho "2" # txn.version secho "0" # txn.locktime ```

Electrum

Electrum is one of the better GUI wallets available, but it also has a pretty good console interface. Like before you need your Trezor with the SLIP-14 wallet loaded and paired to Electrum. I'll assume Electrum is up and running with the Trezor wallet loaded to make things simple.
Like with TrezorCTL, Electrum feeds on a JSON file, but unlike TrezorCTL it needs that JSON squished into the command line. This is a simple sed command, but I won't bore you with the details, but just assume that's done. So the process in Electrum (v4.0.3) looks like:
  1. electrum serialize (create psbt to sign)
  2. electrum --wallet signtransaction (sign said psbt)
Still pretty simple right! Below is the JSON I smushed for #1

txn.json

{ "inputs": [{ "prevout_hash":"e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00", "prevout_n": 0, "value_sats": 129999867 }], "outputs": [{ "address": "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3", "value_sats": 10000000 },{ "address": "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu", "value_sats": 20000000 },{ "address": "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x", "value_sats": 99999694 }]}

HWI

HWI is an unsung hero in my book. It's a very small clean and simple interface between HW wallets and Bitcoin Core. It currently supports a good range of HW wallets. It keeps itself narrowly focused on TXN signing and offloads most everything else to Bitcoin Core. Again, I'll assume you've imported your Trezor keypool into Core and done the requisite IBD and rescan. And if you don't have the RPC enabled, you can always clone these commands into the QT-console.
To sign our TXN in HWI (v1.1.2), we will first need to craft (and finalize) it in Bitcoin Core (0.21.1). Like in Electrum, we will have to use simple sed to smush some JSON into command arguments, but I'll assume you have that covered. It will take an inputs.json and an outputs.json named separately.
  1. bitcoin-cli createpsbt (create psbt)
  2. bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet= walletprocesspsbt (process psbt)
  3. hwi -f signtx (sign psbt)
  4. bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet= finalizepsbt (get a signed TXN from psbt)
A little more involved, but still nothing too bad. Plus this gives you the full power of Bitcoin Core including integrations with LND (lightning).

inputs.json

[{ "txid": "e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00", "vout": 0 }]

outputs.json

[{ "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3": 0.10000000 },{ "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu": 0.20000000 },{ "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x": 0.99999694 }]

Conclusion

This may all seem like very low level coding, but is surprisingly simple once you get a knack for it. Whats more, all these platforms support testnet which allows you to practice with valueless coins until you get the hang of it. And, like many things in bitcoin, this is all (mostly) python, which is one of the easier languages to learn.
Enjoy
Footnotes
1 - https://github.com/trezotrezor-firmware/issues/1296
submitted by brianddk to TREZOR [link] [comments]

Finding a previous signed/verified message

Hi all, this might be impossible, but a few months ago I signed a message through Electrum for a Bitcoin address that then sent tokens to an Ethereum address and the message I had to verify included reference to that Ethereum address. The Bitcoin address is still loaded into my old copy of Electrum, but I cannot find an option to see what that message was.
Reason for looking is that the Ethereum address includes some tokens I need to get out, but I can't find my seed information to get back in to it with Metamask. The address might jog my memory.
submitted by ianmd to Electrum [link] [comments]

The loss of bitcoin

Hello. I use the Electrum app with the Coldcard MK3 cold wallet connection. Left Bitcoin for storage in the wallet. Recently I wanted to make a Deposit to my wallet, but I discovered that there is a missing amount of Bitcoin on my balance. There is also a transfer to an address unknown to me. I did not make this transfer and did not confirm it. I want to find out how I lost my Bitcoin Or what vulnerability I have. When creating a wallet and installing the app, I followed all the security instructions, as well as used virus protection tools on my computer and used genuine original software.
submitted by nikolay347 to Electrum [link] [comments]

How does one watch/poll a wallet for an incomming payment to a certain address, via API?

I want to create **a simple way** to accepting bitcoins on my own, using Electrum. I don't except big volume. I suppose, I'd have at most a handful of incomming payments in the beginning.


That is, I generate an address, a new one for each checkout where Bitcoin is selected as a payment method. And then I'll need to watch an address, via **API of Electrum**, for an incomming payment of a certain amount. The 1st confirmation, at least, **which will have to arrive within, I suppose, 1 hour.**


How can it be implemented? I don't need the code, but a high level explanation: what API to use, potential caveats and suggestions in general.

P.S.

I'm aware of this - https://electrum.readthedocs.io/en/latest/merchant.html , but it won't work for me. I'm a developer, therefore I can create a simpler solution and which I also could customise however I like.
submitted by zigoruma to Electrum [link] [comments]

Electrum unable to sign transaction properly

I'm new to using bitcoin and I'm trying to figure out a problem I've been having trying to broadcast a transaction with Electrum. Initially I was trying to send bitcoin using Electrum's built in "send" function, but kept receiving the error "scriptpubkey." After browsing other forums and seeing issues similar to what I was having, it seemed like people were saying that it was an issue with the server I was connected to. In some cases, people had to try 15-20 different servers before finally being able to send the transaction through.
I thought this was the probable cause of my situation as well so tried about 20 different servers but to no avail. Then I read about "pushing the raw hex transaction" (not sure if I am using the right lingo here) and decided to try that. I was able to make an offline transaction with Electrum and signed it, then obtained the hex code from the .txn file that was created.
I then tried to broadcast the hex code on blockchain.com/btc/pushtx, but I am still receiving the error " Code: -26, Error: scriptpubkey."
So after doing some more research it seems that my problem now is not that there was an issue with servers in Eluctrum, but rather my transactions are not being properly signed. So now I have a signed offline transaction that seems to be improperly signed by Electrum, and I am clueless as to how to correct this.
Is there a way to "unsign" the transaction and sign it again properly? How would I even go about doing that? I fear that I now have money locked up in this faulty transaction that I may not be able to recover. I have all my passwords and everything so I am confused why Electrum would not have signed it properly. I am very new to all this so I'm sure I could be missing something essential. Any advice on how to broadcast and complete my transaction would be much appreciated.
I am running the latest version of Electrum on a Windows 10 computer.

Thanks!
Edit: Latest version of Electrum being 4.0.2
Also, I suppose it is probably helpful to see the decoded transaction here:
{ "version": 2, "locktime": 644562, "ins": [ { "n": 50, "script": { "asm": "", "hex": "" }, "sequence": 4294967293, "txid": "9bc2e9464a58f7d8017fc332f064eb4faf2773daa3251d5194bb851f07afe8c5", "witness": [ "3044022066e5aa2f97647eb34377a1937dc6b7dcad81c652a23c2a5be20e07e2b1af39cf02207bc07ac253b4480c07c4b2d8494d6b18d98a4b17c4bf057468b81d95655f4aa101", "0319a1a5408ccbf7cba4d569bd14b779ded4bbedec040ab84fd9c88d79ab7410fe" ] }, { "n": 8, "script": { "asm": "", "hex": "" }, "sequence": 4294967293, "txid": "dc4e13e07f74b51e623669e2b6f05f7e6e7fa173c07ffcea73b9e84462e6e3c6", "witness": [ "3044022027822d6a6531fa3a4c2b3edfc189afdfad985ade643ebb208eb15174779400b102201db77e06d6158639ae320be5123a3effc00dff48eddf17c03c699334ea58d25a01", "031399274350b7f4888cc34ca1fa1fd915d8e90222026fc89c2d5d42574e0cf7eb" ] } ], "outs": [ { "script": { "addresses": [], "asm": "039135a7d4a9df8a21977f0765ea5667e931be9d1e1f7666d1e264ef539c2c2157", "hex": "21039135a7d4a9df8a21977f0765ea5667e931be9d1e1f7666d1e264ef539c2c2157" }, "value": 1208329 } ], "hash": "b2b8209b1c0e46cddb6ded0758fc8287a97e6b2bd1f88290c1d374b0bab4a6c8", "txid": "b2b8209b1c0e46cddb6ded0758fc8287a97e6b2bd1f88290c1d374b0bab4a6c8" } 

submitted by Arug_1 to Electrum [link] [comments]

What I currently use for privacy

So this is what software I currently use for privacy, would like some opinions if possible:
Starting with my cellphone, my device is a Google Pixel 3A XL with GrapheneOS flashed, I have the following apps installed:
F-Droid and AuroraOSS (as my app stores), NewPipe (youtube client), Vanadium (web browser), Tutanota and K-9 Mail (for e-mails), OsmAnd+ (for maps), Joplin (notes), Open Camera (camera), OpenBoard and Mozc for Android (Keyboard and Japanese Keyboard), Aegis Authenticator, KeePassDX (password manager), LibreTorrent (torrent client), Librera PRO (pdf/epub/mobi reader, I don't own a Kindle nor want to own one so I use my cellphone to read), Tachiyomi (manga reader), Signal (for messaging), Vinyl Music Player, VLC, Simple Gallery Pro and Simple Calendar Pro (I prefer them over stock Graphene options) and I also use Electrum and Samourai (Bitcoin Wallet) and Monerujo (Monero Wallet)
I also have OpenVPN (for VPN) and use a private DNS for ad and tracking blocking (provided by my VPN provider)
I have 3-4 PCs, will go over every single one of them:
my main PC is a desktop PC (that I built myself) that I mainly use for working and other tasks.
It runs Artix Linux (basically Arch Linux without systemd), I use UFW as my firewall (denying all incoming and also denying all outgoing only allowing what is useful) and I also use AppArmor Profiles, I disabled IPV6 and SWAP, configured my VPN connection as well on network settings and I currently run OpenVPN on my computer (my VPN provider allows for multi-hop cascade through OpenVPN in which I can create a custom VPN cascade up to four servers, each consecutive hop re-encrypts my traffic and assigns me a new IP address) and I've also set disk encryption on installation (have set in all of my computers)
As for software: I use Mozilla Firefox as my web browser (I set it to always be in private mode, unchecked suggestions for browsing history, bookmarks, and open tabs, I've also disabled the Firefox data collection in settings and block dangerous and deceptive content, I use DuckDuckGo as my search engine, I use Firefox Home as my default as my homepage. The rest of my tweaks were done in about:config (using privacytools.io site tweaks + geo.enabled = false, network.cookie.lifetimePolicy = 2 and dom.security.https_only_mode as true which are not listed on the site) and the only addons I use are uBlock Origin on Hard Mode and Decentraleyes), KeePassXC (password manager), VIM (use it as a Text Editor and as an IDE for coding), LibreOffice (for working stuff), GIMP (image editor), VLC, qBitTorrent and Tutanota's Desktop Client and Thunderbird (for e-mails)
I also use KVM/QEMU for virtual machines (usually in case I wanna test some distro or use Tails/Whonix)
For my gaming PC (also a desktop I've built myself) I run Manjaro KDE on it, the only apps I have in the system are Firefox (same settings as above), OBS and KVM/QEMU (which I use a Win10 virtual machine for games, there are tutorials on YouTube on how to do so if you're interested). I have the same firewall settings as above, using AppArmor as well and I've also disabled IPV6 and SWAP, I run OpenVPN on it as well as my VPN DNS settings on network settings. I also use different mouse and keyboard on both my PCs and never mix them together.
My other 2 PCs are both laptops, one is a Acer Aspire Nitro I've bought for work (in case I need to work while in a trip or if I wanna work outside etc), it has the same settings and programs as my main PC but I run Gentoo on it. The other laptop is an old ThinkPad that runs Slackware on it, but I rarely use it and this laptop is most of the times not with me for safety reasons.
For some other devices and stuff: I have an Asus RT-AC86U router with OpenWRT flashed on it that I also run OpenVPN config files (this one coming from another provider, I use two VPN providers, on in my PCs and the other in my router), I have a Ledger Nano S as a hardware wallet for both Bitcoin and Monero (most of my cryptocurrency is there, I use hardware wallet for hodling purposes and as my emergency funding) and I have LOTS of USB flash drivers (all of them for Linux Live ISOs purposes), I also have a Nintendo Switch Lite (only gaming console I have, although have not been playing that much on it recently) that I only connect to the internet in case I need to download some updates or play online and after I'm done I immediately disconnect it from the internet.
Some other privacy habits I have are:
I don't own any smart device like Smart TVs (I've been more than 10 years now without watching TV, doesn't even bother me), Smart Fridges or Dishwashers that connect to your internet, ROOMBAS, Smart Home etc, I keep all my money on crypto (and I have a small amount in gold as well, but I rarely invest on it, all my gold is stored in a manual safe here in my apartment) and I only have like, 10 bucks or so in my back account (as soon as I receive any money I just left the necessary in my account to pay bills and put all the rest on crypto, I try to pay everything on crypto or cash), I RARELY use cloud storage, but if I need to, I go with NextCloud and encrypt all my files with VeraCrypt before uploading it, all my VPN services were paid with Bitcoin (I try to pay everything with crypto as previously said) and I never write directly into any website, I usually write my text on a text editor, copy it and paste it on the website (needless to say that I don't use mainstream social media as well)
So, what do you guys think? anything that you would add your recommend me? (before anyone mentions about self-hosting a DNS server using Pi-hole on a Raspberry Pi, I'm actually thinking on doing it in a near future)
EDIT: forgot to mention that I don't watch YouTube on PC on youtube site, I mostly watch youtube's videos on invidio.us and only use the youtube site for watching live streams honestly. And I also barely go outside with my smartphone (only if I really need to) and I usually keep it away from my computers etc.
EDIT 2: also another thing: I covered all my laptop's webcams with black electrical tape, I have a Logitech C922 Pro webcam for my desktop PCs but rarely use it, and when I need to use it, I unplug it as soon as I'm done with it.
submitted by SlackAcademic to privacytoolsIO [link] [comments]

Wallets with Coin Control and Trezor support?

I know that Electrum has Coin Control but I don't like the fact that you have to connect to a server that I don't trust like I would trust a server run by Trezor or Blockstream for example. What I mean is that the server will know all my transaction history, addresses, etc, so at least I need to trust the server. I know of Electrum personal server but last time I checked it was too complicated for me. Same with Bitcoin Core.
Then there's Green wallet by Blockstream but I don't think they have Coin Control.
submitted by Bl4ckBoXx to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Help needed: BTC lost in Dojo / Whirlpool

Hi,
been running mynode (paid version) for some months and I'm really loving it! Thanks to everyone being involved, it's an awesome package.
After running 0.2.0.3 for some weeks with Dojo and Whirlpool now without any problems suddenly shtf and I could not connect to Whirlpool via Whirlpool GUI 10.1 anymore.
Ok, did a lot of research via Google, Reddit etc. I even mailed the mynode premium support but after about a week now the never even responded to my eMail :-(
So what's the problem exactly: couldn't connect via GUI 10.1 no my Whirlpool anymore, always the same error like "could not connect to backend...". As said, nothing was changed and everything was working perfectly before.As mentioned I did a lot of reboots, research etc. and as the last option I installed Dojo and Whirlpool again and did the update to 0.2.0.7 . I connected my Samourai wallet to my Dojo (as mentioned in the mynode pages including the short deletion of my Samourai wallet and then after the successful connection to my Dojo restored my Samourai wallet again without any problems), connected Whirlpool to it, did a fresh install of Whirlpool GUI 10.1. and bingo now I could connect to my Dojo/Whirlpool again.
But what a shock: all funds in premix and in the postmix were gone. Whirlpool is completely empty... :-( I recognized that my Dojo has another TOR address now as it had before but don't know if this is important.
So is there any chance to get my funds that were in my Dojo/Whirlpool back? Aren't my bitcoins stored in my Samourai wallet when using Whirlpool? If not: were are they?
Thank you very much for your support, tips and thoughts!

++Edit 2020.06.07++ Did tons of research and after a lot of frustration got it done and my coins back :-)
Problem: When you restore your Samourai wallet (I did it via my Electrum Server with a new Electrum wallet) you have to do 4 different restores in 4 different wallets: - deposit restore - badbank restore (aka toxic change) - premix restore - postmix restore
Each of these restore needs to have a different derivation path, that did the trick!
I could as posted above and below restore my wallet via Samourai on my phone, but because of the different derivation paths the wallet was always empty...
Couldn't find these 4 different paths via support so if you have the same problem like me, please take a look here Wallets Recovery. Love this page!!!
Hope this post will help someone with the same kind of problems in the future!

submitted by DojoHDLR to mynodebtc [link] [comments]

Recovering 1 BTC from BITCOIN.COM iOS Wallet after latest update!

Hello everyone,
I'm currently helping a friend recover 1 BTC from his iOS phone. I've tried several things but have until now not been able to recover the funds. He never backed up the app.
Importing the 'current' bitcoin core seed into electrum using popular derivation paths like m/44'/0'/0' does not work.
This is the public address: https://www.blockchain.com/btc/address/16pzMmk2WnEM85M7Hi5BucGSvsyqV1DmaM
This balance was available until he updated the app.
I suspect/hope that the phone still has a copy of what Bitcoin.com refers to in much of their support language as a "Legacy Wallet'.
One procedure they recommend is to tap the bitcoin.com logo on the About page 7 times to recover the legacy wallet. I can see a message "no legacy wallet found" when I try this on my Android. But he does not see any change or message when doing this one his iPhone.
Any suggestions? Does anyone know where on the phone this legacy wallet might be stored?
Thanks in advance...
submitted by realmicroguy to btc [link] [comments]

Recovering my bitcoin from 2013

I purchased 1.2 BTC in 2013, spent the 1 BTC so that leaves me with 0.2 BTC, the problem is I can't remember what bitcoin wallet I used, I have the 15 word recovery phrase but i'm not sure if it's BIP39 or not as several words appear on the list but not all.
I know my bitcoin address that works on blockchain but I don't know where to go from here, any help would be greatly appreciated as i'm completely lost on the subject

Edit: I have tried Electrum but it loaded the balance as 0.00 BTC.
submitted by Westwoodo to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

A small story about how I discovered r/BTC, and some stuff I want to say

So, when I first went back to the Crypto community back November 2019, I was rather, hesitant. I just finished verification of a mobile wallet with BTC support called Coins.ph and it made me curious on the crypto it allows: BTC, BCH, ETH, and XRP. I went and shuffled money around, and once my father gave his 0.01 BTC he mined (which I lost like a fraction because of Binance, seriously that place is weird), I decided to keep it to my centralized bank.
Fast forward to February, the bear drop of BTC and most crypto was like a new chance for me. I can finally get something good! So I tried the faucets. Which lead me to finding that CoinPot has decreased withdrawal rates. Well...
BCH entered my crypto portfolio through Bitcoin.com. I'm just a gullible person. Any shiny thing and I go for it the last second. When I learned that BCH is actually faster than BTC (had tested the speed by placing PHP 500 or more or less 0.05 BCH , I took PHP 1,000 and placed it on my account.
It was a fool's attempt, since Philippines just struck quarantine, and I can't do anything about it.
The fast confirmation speed pre-Halving sold it for me, and I thought, maybe I can hold it for a while?
After testing Keys4Coins by buying a steam card, it was really just a few minutes of payment, then I realized that BCH (and pre 2017 BTC) is really peer-to-peer. Back in 2019 until today I was trying to mine XMR (failed to retrieve it after dumping all my BCH and dumping XMR back, showing less money). Back in 2017, just a few weeks before the split, I was trying hard to get enough satoshis to have on my Electrum-built wallet. Which is currently empty.
Right now, I decided to cash out 0.05 BCH because money is needed right now, and my PC froze while I was trying to mine Zcoin. I also decided to try a semi-unused coin named BLUR after asking you guys about what to mine with GPU.
It's not worth it, mining.
Now, let's say some things I want to say lately.
  1. BCH and BTC came from one blockchain and one whitepaper. BTC doesn't follow the whitepaper.
  2. BCH is not yet fully adopted. I know because while we have other countries adopt it, crypto news have it, trolls are fighting against it, there is not even one news of all in the mainstream media.
  3. The IFP is a sound plan, but it doesn't work in the long run. It looks like a forced donation to some whitelisted addresses, which, while might help Bitcoin ABC, will turn Bitcoin ABC into our own Blockstream. Money does that to people, don't push it.
  4. For some reason, I met this guy who claims that Roger Vers owes him $100. Nice guy, knows the good faucets and stuff. He's making a forum that uses Satoshis by the way. Here's a link: Bitcoin Forums.
  5. Also for some reason, BTC trolls have a perspective that BCH is made up of BCH maxis, shills, and idiots. Let their perspective be unchallenged, even if it means that you need to agree to disagree. After all, they are only defending BTC. Let them stick to latest news too, because people don't read old stuff.
  6. I wonder what Satoshi is doing right now? He's probably just lurking in the crypto world, mining his own dev node, doing something new with cryptography... he probably oversaw all this.
  7. BTC is gold bars. BCH is gold coins melted from gold bars sent around. BSV is some shit I don't even understand why they even made in the first place, lol
  8. Bitcoin is not just the name of an revolutionary idea, it's now a name of the first crypto. I have a feeling we will receive less trolls if we stop claiming Bitcoin Cash is true Bitcoin, because in name, Bitcoin (Core) is.
  9. I wonder what will happen if Bitcoin reaches $4,999...
tl:dr; I'm an idiot with cryptocurrency, and BCH is working fine, no need to see anything here, just bored and going insane on quarantine
submitted by RowanSkie to btc [link] [comments]

Electrum wont connect to mynode

having some issues with Electrum wallet on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. i got it to install properly with no issues. but it seems like i am now have trouble connecting it to my node, below is what my .desktop file looks like
# If you want Electrum to appear in a Linux app launcher ("start menu"), install this by doing:
# sudo desktop-file-install electrum.desktop

[Desktop Entry]
Comment=Lightweight Bitcoin Client
Exec=sh -c "PATH=\"\\$HOME/.local/bin:\\$PATH\"; electrum --oneserver --server localhost:50001:t %u"
GenericName[en_US]=Bitcoin Wallet
GenericName=Bitcoin Wallet
Icon=electrum
Name[en_US]=Electrum Bitcoin Wallet
Name=Electrum Bitcoin Wallet
Categories=Finance;Network;
StartupNotify=true
StartupWMClass=electrum
Terminal=false
Type=Application
MimeType=x-scheme-handlebitcoin;
Actions=Testnet;

[Desktop Action Testnet]
Exec=sh -c "PATH=\"\\$HOME/.local/bin:\\$PATH\"; electrum --testnet %u"
Name=Testnet mode


when opening up the wallet, i get the red dot on the bottom right hand corner, i can ping and access mynode via the local 192. address and i see electrum server is running. does it matter where the electrum.desktop file is located? as of right now i have it under /home/gp11/Downloads. is there anything else i can check? even if i remove electrum --oneserver --server localhost:50001:t i still get the same result with no connection, where i am thinking if i remove the line of code it should connect to other nodes.
currently using myNode community Version 0.2.09 any help here would be appreciated - thanks in advance.
submitted by lifeofgp to Electrum [link] [comments]

Bitcoin and Litecoin wallet address Hack bitcoin (private script) 2019 Electrum Part 2 make addresses visible Coinbase - How to Find your Bitcoin wallet address - YouTube Get Private Keys Of All Bitcoin Address In Electrum Wallet ...

Hello friends. I just jumped onto the bitcoin bandwagon and set up Airbitz on my iPhone and Electrum on my Mac desktop. I was able to get bitcoins into my Airbitz wallet on my phone after a few tries with a bitcoin ATM, but when I try to transfer them to my Electrum wallet on my Mac, I keep getting “invalid QR code” messages, whether I try using the QR code or a copy and paste of the address. This website is hosted by Electrum Technologies GmbH Electrum Technologies was founded by Thomas Voegtlin in 2013. Its mission is to develop, package and distribute Electrum software, and to provide services to Bitcoin users and businesses. Address Electrum Technologies GmbH Paul-Lincke-Ufer 8d 10999 Berlin - Germany I've been a big fan of Electrum as a wallet for a while now. Traditionally, when I wanted to do bitcoin scripting I would use either trezorlib, pycoin, or bitcoinlib.But recently I was digging a bit deeper into the Electrum source and found it to be one of the simpler python libraries to use to craft bitcoin transactions. Where can I find my bitcoin address? You can find your Bitcoin Cash (BCH) or Bitcoin Core (BTC) address for receiving payments into your Bitcoin.com wallet by tapping "Receive" on the bottom tool bar of your wallet.Your address will be the long string of numbers and letters directly below the QR code for that address. What is my BTC address? Your BTC address is a string of 26-35 letters and numbers that identify your Bitcoin wallet. BTC addresses begin with either a 1 or a 3 and are case-sensitive. When you want to receive funds, this is the information that you provide to the person paying you. Your BTC address is oftentimes called your wallet address or your public address. This address is considered ...

[index] [41704] [14328] [15394] [29374] [11301] [46066] [48411] [2216] [21769] [41302]

Bitcoin and Litecoin wallet address

Get Private Keys Of All Bitcoin Address In Electrum Wallet. WARNING: Do not give your private keys to anybody. Also, read the warning in the window that will... Where Is Cash App Bitcoin Wallet Address? __ Try Cash App using my code and we’ll each get $5! SFGQXGB https://cash.me/$AnthonyCashHere __ Price Check: https... How To Shown All Bitcoin Address in Electrum Wallet. Receiving Bitcoin with Electrum Wallet Click the “Receive” tab on the main Electrum window. Next, to the... How to Install the Genuine Electrum Bitcoin Wallet (and Avoid the "Fake" One) - Duration: 27:12. ... How to sign a Bitcoin address to claim free Hex - Duration: 2:39. Brisology 1,004 views. 2:39 ... How to use your Bitcoin and Litecoin wallet address and more videos at http://jmlbusinesspro.com/ How to Video and Marketing Tutorials By Jose Nunes Get more...

#